Category 
Research

Uncover meaningful insights with PLOTTO's analytics

So you’ve created an online video survey, collected your responses, and you’ve got a pile of videos to sift through. At this point you might be thinking: great result, but what does it all mean?
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December 18, 2019

So you’ve created an online video survey, collected your responses, and you’ve got a pile of videos to sift through. At this point you might be thinking: great result, but what does it all mean? Luckily Plotto’s analytics tools will make it fantastically easy for you to work that out.

Say you want to research people’s attitudes to sun cream. You might post some questions about where they buy it and when they wear it using a multiple-choice question format. You might then want your respondents to expand on how they cater for their skin’s needs; for these kinds of questions when you can’t second guess what the respondent will say, you ask them to post a video. You might also ask them to type in free text on open-ended questions – such as the top three things they look for in sun cream. Wading through all these responses respondent by respondent wouldn’t be time-efficient, but the tools on Plotto help you to get the most out of your research by drilling down into the areas of most interest.

The first thing that happens to all video responses is that they are automatically transcribed.* The transcripts then act as a foundation for most of the great analysis tools that Plotto offers. So all response types – whether multiple-choice, video or free text - can be searched to find the answers you need.

If you want to search on subject matter – say, any mentions of sunburn, or only videos that mention UV filters - you can isolate the videos or free text answers that contain those references. You can also save your searches so you can go back to them later.

If you’d like to identify the issues that respondents are talking about most in the survey, then keywords – the most frequent words that crop up in responses – can help direct your analysis by giving an idea of what is top of mind for people when they think of sun cream.

If you are interested in how people feel – perhaps which subject they attach a certain emotion to (what makes them surprised or angry? Why are they contemptuous about UVA filters?) - or how they react emotionally to a new sunscreen concept, then it is easy to narrow down results based on different emotions. Sentiment analysis classifies the content as either positive, neutral or negative, while facial emotion analysis detects the emotions anger, contempt, disgust, fear, happiness, neutral, sadness, and surprise.

You might also want to isolate different groups of people depending on their answers to multiple-choice questions to then further define their characteristics. For example, if you want to see what kind of people only buy sunscreen in the supermarket – how old they are, or what sort of opinions and values they have - Plotto’s graphical interface allows you to simply select those people and take your analysis from there. Similarly, you can filter respondents based on other attributes or recruitment criteria including demographics, and tags that you can create and apply to each individual.

Within the hours of footage that your respondents have provided are nestled some powerful insights. You just need to get to them, and Plotto will get you there.

* automatic transcription applies to all surveys conducted in major European languages, Brazilian Portuguese, Mandarin Chinese, Japanese and Modern Standard Arabic. All other languages can be manually transcribed.